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Greenhouse Flooring Options

Pavers as a Greenhouse Floor

Fancy Paver Pattern for Greenhouse Floor

We put so much time into planning out our greenhouses — glazing options, size, lighting, bench/table configurations, even décor. But sometimes, we forget to consider one of the most basic elements of the greenhouse, the floor. There are many options for flooring material, ranging in cost from quite inexpensive to fairly costly, but every greenhouse floor must start with positive drainage. With all of the misting and watering that occurs daily, the last thing you want is to create a soggy, slick basis for walking and working. So start with good drainage and take that into account as you are making your flooring decisions, then check out these options to determine which one fits your budget, aesthetic and lifestyle. 

Concrete

Although pouring a concrete slab is likely one of the more expensive flooring options, it creates a permanent, solid basis for your greenhouse activities. Much like a patio floor, a concrete greenhouse floor will need to have a surface drain installed to allow water to drain out. Pouring a concrete floor is not an easy DIY project as there are too many variables to cover, so this is an option best left to the pros. The investment will repay you many times over, though.

Stone

Similar to the concrete slab, stone flooring is a more permanent option, especially when mortared in place. If you opt to forego mortaring, space the stone closer together and use a stabilizer in between such as decomposed granite or gravel. Make sure you choose a stone that has a flatter, smooth surface, as you don’t want to be tripping as you work — look for larger, flatter pieces labeled “flagstone” or “patio stone,” and forego lesser expensive “field stone” that tends to have a bumpy, irregular surface.  A surface drain is also a must if you opt for a mortared stone floor.

Brick

Brick flooring is a beautiful, elegant and permanent option, but it can also be a more expensive one. Brick, like stone, does not necessarily need to be mortared in place, but it will need a surface drain if it is. If your greenhouse location has relatively level ground, and you have some basic DIY skills, this could be a project for you to take on, but most greenhouse owners will want to consider hiring the pros to correctly install this floor.

Gravel

Many greenhouse owners opt for pea gravel for their flooring. It’s inexpensive, creates positive drainage and is readily available. You can also opt to install weed barrier underneath the gravel, and option that I recommend to keep the gravel from settling into the soil and disappearing. Be sure to keep the gravel clean by periodically washing it down, as a build-up of moisture can create a slick surface. As easy DIY project, gravel is a great middle-of-the-road approach to creating a functional greenhouse floor. 

Weed Cloth

Also known as weed barrier, this woven black fabric is the choice of many commercial greenhouses to suppress weeds and create a nice level floor for walking and working. It allows water to pass through, creating positive drainage, while at the same time keeping your floor from becoming muddy. If you choose this option, go for the more expensive, commercial grade fabric, as it truly is a more durable and effective product. As with most things in life, you get what you pay for — and why go to the trouble of installing this product if it’s not going to do the job?

Mulch

Good old-fashioned mulch is a great option for greenhouse floors — it provides great drainage, sure footing and enriches the soil as it breaks down. It’s also readily available and inexpensive. Opt for a higher quality shredded mulch rather than wood chips, as shredded mulch interlocks to form a tighter mat upon which to walk. You’ll need to replenish your mulch floor as it breaks down, but it’s an easy annual task that any homeowner can do. It’s available both in bags as well as in bulk (per cubic yard), with the bulk option being the least expensive by far.

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Ground Cover – New Product Now Available

Weed Barrier Floor in Greenhouse

Ground Cover Used as Greenhouse Flooring

We are happy to announce the addition of rolls of ground cover to our product line. This is a versatile product that has many uses. It is an excellent flooring for a greenhouse. It can be used by itself, or you can place sand, gravel or pavers over the top of this material. The UV protection ensures a long life. It is also used by commercial nurseries in the fields. Liners, which are immature plants, will be placed on this cloth for additional growing. We personally use it in the walkways of our vegetable garden. I have seen people cut it in circles and use it in conjunction with edging and mulch around trees. This weed barrier is good to use basically anywhere were you do not want weeds to grow. Available in rolls only in 3′, 4′, 6′, 10′, 12′ and 15′ widths by 300′ lengths.

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Free To All Webinar Greenhouse Chat From AOS

Glass Greenhouse with Orchids

Orchids in Glass Greenhouse

Are you interested in growing orchids in your greenhouse? The American Orchid Society (AOS) is offering a free to all webinar next week. This will be put on by Ron McHatton of the AOS. A variety of topics on orchid culture in the greenhouse will be discussed. If you register early, you can submit any questions that you may have. This looks like a very informative webinar. Plus, you can’t beat the cost of free. Even if you are just considering purchasing a greenhouse to grow orchids in this will have a lot of information for you. Plus, I am sure there will be lots of advanced growing information as well. Will you be there? I will. I am already registered. To register, simply click this link. http://bit.ly/2sOZYSZ

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Greenhouse Shade Cloth

Greenhouse Shade Cloth

Reflective Shade Cloth for Greenhouse

It seems to me that a lot of people struggle with the decision on which shade cloth is best for their greenhouse. I think they are way over complicating the issue. A greenhouse shade cloth is pretty much like stepping under a shade tree in the summer. You have felt the cooling pretty much right away when you do this. A shade cloth does pretty much the same thing. There are several different choices of material, but the differences are pretty basic. The woven shade cloth is the least expensive. It is a black color. It must be taped on the edges, or it will ravel. It is best used on the outside of the greenhouse. The next choice is a woven shade cloth. This will be intermediate in pricing. It is really nice, as it has some stretch and will not ravel, so the taping is not a necessity with this type. Although we do tape all of our edges so we can add grommets for simple installation. I personally prefer to use this with a greenhouse with automatic roof vents. The way we have always done it is to put the shade cloth on tight on the ends. As we near the vents, we don’t fasten the shade down as tight. We will go back for the next 3 or 4 days and adjust as needed. You want to make sure that there is no strain on the vents when they are trying to open. The next choice is the reflective shade cloth. This is the most expensive, but it is a good choice to use on the inside of a greenhouse. A lot of commercial growers like this for exterior applications as well. Probably the most common question I get is – what percentage should I use? The higher the percent, the more shade you will get. I have found through the years that a lot of orchid growers will prefer a 50% shade cloth. For general purpose growing, ie vegetables, annuals, etc, a 60% to 70% shade is typically used.

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How to Cut Polycarbonate Sheets

I get a lot of questions about cutting polycarbonate sheets. It is really quite simple. Pretty much the same as cutting a sheet of plywood. There are just a few tricks to remember to get a really good, clean installation. Watch this video to learn how to cut polycarbonate sheets. Have more questions about installing polycarbonate? Subscribe to Advance Greenhouse YouTube channel and our polycarbonate glazing tips playlist.

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Build Your Own Greenhouse – How To Figure How Many Polycarbonate Sheets and Profiles are Needed

I get asked this question every day. How do I figure how many polycarbonate sheets and profiles do I need to build my greenhouse? I think the problem is that everyone tries to look at it as a complete project. The easiest way to do this is to break the greenhouse into sections. Figure one side of the roof, then multiply by 2. Figure one side wall, then multiply by 2. Figure one gable end and multiply by 2. Add these together and you have your complete bill of material. The following video outlines this in more detail for you. Please remember, if you cannot figure your own bill of material, how are you going to be able to figure out where to put the parts when you receive it? It takes just a few minutes to get a better grasp on polycarbonate installation. Just remember, don’t over think the process, and watch all of our videos in our Polycarbonate Glazing Tips playlist.

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Polycarbonate sheets – proper installation

Many people are confused about how to install polycarbonate sheets on their greenhouses. There are just a few basic rules to follow. This video outlines some of the basic storage and installation tips. We will discuss a few more of the basic installation tips regarding framing and fastening in future videos. There are all steadfast rules that must be followed for a leak free, worry free installation.

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Greenhouse Growing, It’s a Learning Curve

Greenhouse Accessories

I received a really nice email from a gentleman the other day who had read one of my previous articles regarding greenhouse accessories. He pointed out to me that he did not use the accessories in exactly the same way as I outline in my article. This just served as a reminder to me that greenhouse growing is indeed a learning curve for all of us. Here’s the thing – We all live in different climates. We are all growing different plants. It is up to us as greenhouse owners to learn how to supply the necessary climate in the area we live in. He mentioned that he only used his heater at night in his location. I would dare to say that someone in Wisconsin growing tomatoes in the winter would totally disagree with this. He also mentioned an evaporative cooling system. He was in a location with a desert type climate. I can see where that would work for him. But here, in Louisiana we have just about 100% humidity (I am sure it just feels that way) all summer long. An evaporative cooling system is totally ineffective here. He also considered a shade cloth as an optional accessory. I consider it an absolute necessity. That is, if you are using your greenhouse at any time except in the winter months. If you have it shut down in the spring, summer and fall, I would not really suggest getting one. When someone calls me asking about greenhouses and accessories, I recommend that they at least get a ventilation system at the same time, as it is installed into the greenhouse frame. This is easier as an initial installation than it is as a retrofit. I don’t like loading greenhouses up with a whole lot of equipment that you may not need at a later time. I suggest adding additional accessories one at a time and as the need arises. Of course don’t wait for the last minute, because everyone else will be in need at the same time. For custom made items such as a shade cloth, this can lead to a delayed lead time. The thing is, we are buying a greenhouse maybe for practical reasons, but most of us are purchasing them for our love of growing. So relax, take the time, learn what you need in your area, for your plants to make your greenhouse a success. And as always, keep growing!

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Lean To Greenhouses and Attached Greenhouses

Here is the latest edition of our “The Greenhouse Minute” series. Today’s topic is lean to greenhouses. Many think they are unable to build a lean to greenhouse because of height, width or length restrictions. We are able to do many customizations with these greenhouses and make one that will fit just about anywhere. If you need some guidance about the possibility of building an attached greenhouse for your home or building, please contact us and we will do our best to answer your questions and help you come up with a solution that meets your needs.

 

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